Role Title

ec

Kenneth Arrow

General Director - previous
Stanford

Read More
Kenneth Arrow (1921–2017) was an American economist, mathematician, writer, and political theorist. He was the joint winner of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences with John Hicks in 1972.

In economics, he was a major figure in post-World War II neo-classical economic theory. His most significant works are his contributions to social choice theory, notably "Arrow's impossibility theorem", and his work on general equilibrium analysis. He has also provided foundational work in many other areas of economics, including endogenous growth theory and the economics of information.
Prof. Arrow was the General Director of the Jerusalem School in Economic Theory at the IIAS from 1990-2007.

Photo by Linda A. Cicero / Stanford News Service

Read Less
vardi

Moshe Vardi

General Director - current
Rice University

Moshe Y. Vardi is an Israeli mathematician and a computer scientist. He is the George Distinguished Service Professor in Computational Engineering at Rice University.

Read More
His interests focus on applications of logic to computer science, including database theory, finite-model theory, knowledge in multi-agent systems, computer-aided verification and reasoning, and teaching logic across the curriculum. He is an expert in model checking, constraint satisfaction and database theory, common knowledge (logic), and theoretical computer science.

He is the author and co-author of over 600 papers, as well as two books: Reasoning about Knowledge and Finite Model Theory and Its Applications. He is currently a Senior Editor of the Communications of the ACM, after having served for a decade as Editor-in-Chief.

Read Less
Sarnak,Peter-Photo-by-Cliff-Moore-forWeb

Peter Sarnak

IAS Princeton
MATH
IAS Princeton

Read More
Peter Sarnak is Professor of Mathematics at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. He has made major contributions to number theory and to questions in analysis motivated by number theory. His interest in mathematics is wide-ranging, and his research focuses on the theory of zeta functions and automorphic forms with applications to number theory, combinatorics, and mathematical physics. His many awards include the Wolf Prize in Mathematics, the Lester Ford Prize, the American Mathematical Society Levi L. Conant Prize, the Frank Nelson Cole Prize, the Ostrowski Prize and the George Pólya Prize from the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

Read Less
EricMaskin

Eric Maskin

General Director - current
Harvard

Eric Stark Maskin is an American economist and 2007 Nobel laureate recognized with Leonid Hurwicz and Roger Myerson "for having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory".
 

Read More
He also has made contributions to game theory, contract theory, social choice theory, political economy, and other areas of economics. He is the Adams University Professor at Harvard University. He was a faculty member at MIT from 1977-1984, Harvard from 1985-2000, and the Institute for Advanced Study from 2000-2011. He rejoined the Harvard faculty in 2012.

Read Less
roger_kornberg

Roger Kornberg

General Director - current
Life Sciences
Stanford University

structural biology

Roger D. Kornberg is an American biochemist and professor of structural biology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Kornberg was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2006 for his studies of the process by which genetic information from DNA is copied to RNA, "the molecular basis of eukaryotic transcription.”

Anthony Grafton

Anthony Grafton

General Director
Princeton University

Early Modern Europe & History of Science

Professor Grafton’s current project is a large-scale study of the science of chronology in 16th- and 17th-century Europe: how scholars attempted to assign dates to past events, reconstruct ancient calendars, and reconcile the Bible with competing accounts of the past. He hopes to reconstruct the complex and dramatic process by which the biblical regime of historical time collapsed, concentrating on the first half of the 17th century. Professor Grafton’s special interests lie in the cultural history of Renaissance Europe, the history of books and readers, the history of scholarship and education in the West from Antiquity to the 19th century, and the history of science from Antiquity to the Renaissance. He joined the Princeton History Department in 1975 after earning his A.B. (1971) and Ph.D. (1975) in history from the University of Chicago and spending a year at University College London, where he studied with Arnaldo Momigliano.

Read More

Professor Grafton likes to see the past through the eyes of influential and original writers, and has accordingly written intellectual biographies of a 15th-century Italian humanist, architect, and town planner, Leon Battista Alberti; a 16th-century Italian astrologer and medical man, Girolamo Cardano; and a 16th-century French classicist and historian, Joseph Scaliger. He also studies the long-term history of scholarly practices, such as forgery and the citation of sources, and has worked on many other topics in cultural and intellectual history. Professor Grafton is the author of ten books and the coauthor, editor, coeditor, or translator of nine others. Two collections of essays, Defenders of the Text (1991) and Bring Out Your Dead (2001), cover most of the topics and themes that appeal to him. He has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship (1989), the Los Angeles Times Book Prize (1993), the Balzan Prize for History of Humanities (2002), and the Mellon Foundation’s Distinguished Achievement Award (2003), and is a member of the American Philosophical Society and the British Academy. In 2011 he served as President of the American Historical Association. At Princeton he is the Henry Putnam University Professor of History.

Read Less