Sovereignty, Global Justice and The Ethics of War

[RG # 126] Sovereignty, Global Justice And The Ethics Of War

March 1, 2011 - August 31, 2011

Organizer:

Eyal Benvenisti (Tel Aviv University)
Yitzhak Benbajo (Bar-Ilan University)

In an era of globalization and massive institutional change in the international community, developing a workable set of ideas about global or international justice is one of the most important tasks facing philosophers, political theorists, lawyers and economics. Current events raise imperative political and moral questios concerning the moral standing of states and ethnocultural communities, states' rights against interventional in their internal affairs, their right to use force to protect their territorial integrity, and their right to protect their citizens or to protect citizens of other states.

Similarly, the growing interdependence among states introduces an entire set of concerns regarding global distributive justice, whereas the histories of relationships among states (colonialism, wars, secessions, etc.) suggest concerns regarding global corrective justice. These questions focus on the duties of affluent states to aid poor countries and refugees, the duties of colonial states to compensate their former colonies, the just treatment of statelessness and the just distribution of cultural rights, citizenship, residency, wealth, and the world's natural resources. These ample practical applications of global justice are what make it one of the most viable and increasingly important subfields of political philosophy.

Some of the most fundamental themes of global justice have been widely discussed in the context of just war theory. 

The research group will study three areas:

(1) The morality of the laws of war, with special attention to the institutional arrangements recommended by the statist and the cosmopolitan competing theories of just wars

(2) The statist and cosmopolitan theories of global justice, mainly distributive, but also corrective

(3) How debates between statists and cosmopolitans in these two fields -- international justice and just war theory -- are related, and how morality and the laws of war are implemented in the different conceptions of international justice.

 

 

Members

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Yitzhak Benbaji

FELLOW
Bar-Ilan University
Yitzchak is a professor in the Faculty of Law and Department of Philosophy at Bar-Ilan University.
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Eyal Benvenisti

FELLOW
Tel Aviv University
Eyal is a professor in the Faculty of Law at Tel Aviv University. His research interests are international law, constitutional law, and administrative law.
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Tsilly Dagan

FELLOW
Bar-Ilan University
Tsilly is a professor in the Faculty of Law at Bar-Ilan University.
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Chaim Gans

FELLOW
Tel Aviv University
Chaim is a professor in the Faculty of Law at Tel Aviv University.
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Judith Lichtenberg

FELLOW
Georgetown University
Judith is a professor in the Department of Philosophy at Georgetown University.
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David J. Luban

FELLOW
Georgetown University
David is a professor at Georgetown University Law Center.
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Balakrishnan Rajagopal

FELLOW
MIT
Balakrishnan is a professor in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT.
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Michael Walzer

FELLOW
IAS Princeton
Michael is a professor in the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.