Encountering Scripture In Overlapping Cultures: Early Jewish, Christian And Muslim Strategies Of Reading And Their Contemporary Implications

[RG #121] Encountering Scripture In Overlapping Cultures: Early Jewish, Christian And Muslim Strategies Of Reading And Their Contemporary Implications

September 1, 2010 - February 28, 2011

Organizers:

Meir Bar-Asher (The Hebrew University)
Mordechai Cohen (Yeshiva University)

Contemporary critical theory, which highlights the creative dimension of the reading process, is increasingly reorienting the study of the history of scriptural interpretation, situating it within the flux of literary and cultural movements at large. This international research group brings together scholars of Jewish, Christian and Muslim interpretation to conduct a close comparative analysis of shifting encounters with Scripture in three overlapping cultures. Drawing upon diverse yet complimentary perspectives, the participants in this group will investigate five fundamental subjects:

a. The critical role that interpretation played in the formation of Sacred Scripture;

b. Changing conceptions of the "plain sense" of Scripture;

c. The ways in which classical rhetoric and poetics informed scriptural interpretation;

d. Tensions created by the need to transplant Scripture into new linguistic media;

e. The ways in which the Bible has been reconfigured in literature, art and scholarship.

 

 

Members

men

Sidney Griffith

FELLOW
The Catholic University of America
Sidney is a professor in the Department of Semitic Languages at the Institute of Christian Oriental Research, The Catholic University of America.
men

Yaakov Kaduri

FELLOW
Bar-Ilan University
Yaakov is a professor in the Bible Department at Bar-Ilan University. His research interests are Hebrew Bible, history of Bible exegesis, and Judaism.

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