Research Group

men

Eloy Revilla Sanchez

FELLOW
Spanish National Research Council
Eloy is a professor in the Department of Applied Biology at the Spanish National Research Council.
men

David Saltz

FELLOW
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
David is a professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.
men

Ran Nathan

FELLOW
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Ran is a professor in the Department of Evolution, Systematics and Ecology at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
men

Ronen Kadmon

FELLOW
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Ronen is a professor in the Department of Evolution, Systematics and Ecology at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
men

Marcel Holyoak

FELLOW
UC Davis
Marcel is a professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at University of California, Davis.
men

Wayne Getz

FELLOW
UC Berkeley
Wayne is a professor in the Department of Environmental Science Policy and Management at University of California, Berkeley.

Movement Ecology: Establishing a Novel Interdisciplinary Field of Research to Explore the Causes, Patterns, Mechanisms and Consequences of Organism Movements

[RG #105] Movement Ecology: Establishing a Novel Interdisciplinary Field of Research to Explore the Causes, Patterns, Mechanisms and Consequences of Organism Movements

September 1, 2006 - August 31, 2007

Organizer:

Ran Nathan (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Read More
We begin our research with the premise that movement is virtually a condition of life, as all living organisms move at some stage of their lives. There have been at least 25,000 papers published in the last decade on various aspects of movement, both in the ecological and allied biological literatures, but this field of study -- while extremely active, indeed growing -- still lacks a coherent focus. Previous attempts to provide this focus have moved the field along incrementally, but it can still be said that the literature consists of a voluminous collection of loosely related work, and the field is still defined more by what large numbers of people are doing individually rather than by any sense of a coherent field.

We aim to develop a coherent representation that captures the essential features of movement in terms of casual components, goals, information requirements and capacities, around which future studies could be organized and from which predictable consequences could be established for all sorts of organisms. This would be a launching pad for mathematical modeling, hypothesis generation, measurement and data analysis -- a coherent basis reaching from first principles to consequences, and allowing prediction and testing in real world situations. The four elements of the framework are the internal state of the organism, its movement and navigation mechanisms, and the external factors affecting the system, all resulting in the final movement behaviour and trajectory.

Once the framework has been developed, we can develop qualitative mathematical machinery that will allow us to simulate movement patterns under various explicit assumptions abot the four basic components of our conceptual model. If we can simulate under different scenarios, we can predict. If we can predict, we can compare prediction with observation, and we can test hypotheses about the model itself and our construction of it as being representative of reality.

 

Read Less
av

Sigrun Svavarsdottir

FELLOW
Ohio State University
Sigrun is a professor in the Department of Philosophy at Ohio State University. Her research interests are moral philosophy, and action theory-moral psychology.
men

Ralph Wedgwood

FELLOW
University of Oxford
Ralph is a professor in the Department of Philosophy at Merton College, University of Oxford.
men

Mark Schroeder

FELLOW
University of South California
Mark is a professor in the School of Philosophy at the University of Southern California.
men

David Heyd

FELLOW
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
David is a professor in the Department of Philosophy at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
men

Nadeem Hussain

FELLOW
Stanford University
Nadeem is a professor in the Department of Philosophy at Stanford University.

Moral Psychology, Moral Motivation and Moral Realism

[RG #112] Moral Psychology, Moral Motivation and Moral Realism

March 1 - August 31, 2008

Organizer:

David Enoch (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

Read More
Metaethics is the philosophical sub-discipline that does not study normative issues (such as which actions are right, what makes a life go better, etc.) but rather second-order questions, questions about (not within) morality. These include the semantics, metaphysics, epistemology, and psychology of morality (and perhaps of other normative discourse). Modern metaethics is said to have emerged at the beginning of the 20th century (perhaps with Moore's Principia Ethica), and dominated the philosophical interest in morality until the 1960s when philosophical study of first-order, normative issues became more popular and influential. But the last decade or so has witnessed a tremendous rise in the philosophical interest in metaethics.

Though not often found in the interdisciplinary literature -- metaethics (in the analytic tradition) is a fairly abstract, professional-philosophical debate -- metaethics is easily characterizable as intersubdisciplinary: one cannot seriously study the metaphysics of morals without possessing at least a good overall grasp of metaphysics; one cannot seriously study moral epistemology without at least a good overall understanding of epistemology; and similarly, it is impossible to me a metaethicist without a good grasp of major theories and arguments in the philosophy of language, mind, and action, and perhaps in aesthetics as well.

Indeed, the metaethical debate has recently become even wider in scope, for it is now widely noted that just as morality is a particular instance of a largely normative discourse, metaethics is a particular instance of metanormativity. Normative discourse also includes, for example, the part of epistemic discourse that deals with obviously normative notions such as justification, entitlement, and reasons for belief. There is a close link between the philosophical problems surrounding moral discourse and those surrounding epistemic discourse. And a comprehensive metanormative theory will need to be general enough to be applied to different kinds of normative discourses (such as morality, the normative part of epistemology, some parts of aesthetic discourse), but also to accomodate the differences between them.

 

Read Less
av

Pnina Lahav

FELLOW
Boston University
Pnina is a professor in the School of Law at Boston University. Her research interests are constitutional law and legal history.