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hershberg

Uri Hershberg

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Drexel University
Uri Hershberg is an Associate Professor at the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems and the Department of Immunology and Microbiology …
sol

Sol Efroni

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Bar-Ilan University
Sol Efroni is a Professor in Systems Biomedicine Lab at Bar-Ilan University. His research focuses on systems biology.
Agi Mishol, Photo:Bar Gordon

Agi Mishol

Poet
Israel

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Agi Mishol is one of Israel’s most prominent and popular poets, and the author of 16 volumes of poetry.

Mishol was born in Romania in 1947 to Hungarian-speaking Holocaust survivors. When she was four-years old, her family immigrated to Israel and settled in Gedera. After completing her BA and MA degrees in Hebrew Literature at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mishol launched a literature and creative-writing teaching career, at Ben-Gurion University, Tel Aviv University, and The Hebrew University (where she was Poet-in-Residence in 2007), among other institutions. In 2006, she served as the artistic director of the Jerusalem International Poetry Festival, and since 2011, she has led the Helicon School of Poetry in Tel Aviv. She lives in Moshav Kfar Mordechai, where she grows peaches, persimmons, and pomegranates.

The topics of Mishol’s poetic spectrum encompass flora and fauna, varied and colorful landscapes, love and romance, powerful eroticism, and the observation of the human condition. Her writing balances lyric precision and accessibility to the readers, combining everyday language and colloquial expression with inventive linguistics. Infused with irony and humor, her poems are intimate and personal yet extensive in their human insight. Mishol’s work centers on the bond between humans and the environment, the changing seasons and the circles of nature and life, while resonating the anxieties and pains of Jewish history and reflecting on contemporary Israeli society.

Mishol’s poems have been widely translated and published in books and various anthologies around the world. Some of her poems were composed by various Israeli musicians.

Her accolades include the Zbigniew Herbert International Literary Award (2019), the Newman Prize for life achievement in literature (2018), the Italian LericiPea Award (2014), and the Israeli Prime Minister and Yehuda Amichai literature prizes (1995 and 2002, respectively). Mishol was awarded three honorary doctorates – from Tel Aviv University (2014), the Weizmann Institute of Science (2016), and Bar-Ilan University (2018).

Events:

22 February, מחלוני וגם מחלונך: סדנת שירה בהנחיית המשוררת אגי משעול

23-25 June, כי המוח הוא חתיכת רעל: תערוכה משותפת למשוררת אגי משעול ולאמן הרישום יואב ויינפלד

30 July, שיח גלריה: כי המוח הוא חתיכת רעל

 
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Computability: Historical, Logical and Philosophical Foundations

[RG#143] Computability: Historical, Logical and Philosophical Foundations

September 1, 2015 - January 31, 2016

Organizers:

Jack Copeland (University of Canterbury)
Eli Dresner (Tel Aviv University)

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The theory of computability was launched in the 1930s by a group of logicians who proposed new characterizations of the ancient idea of an algorithmic process. The theoretical and philosophical work that these thinkers carried out laid the foundations for the computer revolution, and this revolution in turn fuelled the fantastic expansion of scientific knowledge in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. 

The 1930s revolution was a critical moment in the history of science: ideas conceived at that time have become cornerstones of current science and technology. Since then, many diverse computational paradigms have blossomed, and still others are the object of current theoretical enquiry - massively parallel and distributed computing, quantum computing, real-time interactive asynchronous computing, relativistic computing, hypercomputing, nano-computing, DNA computing, neuron-like computing, computing over the reals, computing involving quantum random-number generators. The list goes on; few of these forms of computation were even envisaged during the 1930s' analysis of computability.

The fundamental question tackled by the group is: do the concepts introduced by the early pioneers provide the logico-mathematical foundation for what we call computing today, or is there a need to overhaul the foundations of computing to fit the twenty-first century?

 

 

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The Poetics of Christian Performance: Prayer, Liturgy, and their Environments in East and West (5th to 11th Century)

[RG # 144] The Poetics of Christian Performance: Prayer, Liturgy, and their Environments in East and West (5th to 11th Century)

September 1, 2015 - June 30, 2016

Organizers:

Bruria Bitton-Ashkeloni (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
Derek Krueger (University of North Carolina at Greensboro)

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This interdisciplinary research project is exploring the performance of prayer, liturgy, and hymns among a variety of Eastern and Western Christian traditions from the end of Antiquity to the Middle Ages. Focusing on the history and environments of worship shifts the emphasis in the comparative study of Christianity beyond the history of doctrine.

The timeline extended from the Council of Chalcedon in 451 - when the great division between Eastern Christianities took place - to the eleventh century, just before the cultural upheaval brought about by the Crusades. The geographical framework includes Christianity's religious centers - Palestine, Constantipole, and Rome - and its periphery - East Syria and Medieval France. New models of piety, the ways in which people imagined their interaction with the divine, and the rise of asceticism in the late antique Mediterranean world brought forth new conceptions and patterns of worship. Novel religious performances played a vital role in shaping Christian identities in Byzantium and the Latin West as well as encoding specific poetics and theories of how religion should function. Bringing together historians of religion, art, architecture, and music, the project is focused on religious performance as a way to re-narrate the history of Christian religious culture in the East and West in its social and intellectual contexts.

 

 

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A Lasting Vision: Dandin’s Mirror in the World of Asian Letters

[RG #145] A Lasting Vision: Dandin’s Mirror in the World of Asian Letters

September 1, 2015 - January 31, 2016

Organizer: Yigal Bronner (The Hebrew University)

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Dandin’s Mirror of Poetry (Kāvyādarśa), a Sanskrit work on poetics composed in South India around 700 CE, is one of the most influential treatises ever produced in Asia.

The work was translated and adapted into a variety of languages in the south of the Indian peninsula and the island of Sri Lanka (Kannada, Tamil, Sinhala, and Pali), travelled to Southeast Asia (Burma and Indonesia), was repeatedly translated in northern and central Asia (Tibet and Mongolia), and may even have exercised influence on poetic praxis in China. Moreover, it is hard to overstate the profound impact of Dandin’s Mirror, which, in distant corners of Asia and at different times, consistently emboldened new literary beginnings.

 

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Konstan David

David Konstan

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New York University

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Prof. David Konstan's research focuses on ancient Greek and Latin literature, especially comedy and the novel, and classical philosophy. In recent years, he has investigated the emotions and value concepts of classical Greece and Rome, and has written books on friendship, pity, the emotions, forgiveness, and beauty. He has also written on ancient physics and atomic theory and on literary theory, and has translated Seneca’s two tragedies about Hercules into verse. He is currently working on a book on ancient vs. modern conceptions of loyalty, gratitude, love, and grief.

Read more about Professor Konstan here.

 

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chloi balla

Chloe Balla

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University of Crete
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Prof. Chloe Balla is Associate Professor and the Director of the Laboratory of Philosophical Research and Translation at the University of Crete. She is a Plato scholar with a special interest in Plato’s criticism of the sophists and his representation of Socrates, and is currently working on a monograph of Plato’s Phaedo (working title: Only reason left alive: Plato’s Phaedo as an exhortation to philosophy). 

Read more about Professor Balla here.

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david johnson

David Johnson

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Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
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David Johnson is a leading expert in Xenophon's Socratic and non-Socratic writings. He is the author of numerous articles on central issues in this field, and is the co-editor with Gabriel Danzig and Donald Morrison of Plato and Xenophon: Comparative Studies. He is one of the chief instigators of the revival in the study of Xenophon's Socratic writings, and brings a vast knowledge of Xenophon and all the literature surrounding him, both in the fourth century and in modern scholarship.

 

 

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Olga Chernyakhovskaya

Olga Chernyakhovskaya

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Otto-Friedrich Universität Bamberg
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Dr. Olga Chernyakhovskaya is a recent PhD recipient and has already established a name for herself as a leading researcher of Socratic literature. Her book "Socrates bei Xenophon" offers a comprehensive philological and philosophical analysis of Xenophon's Socratic writings. In addition to the book, she has written numerous articles on various aspects of Socratic philosophy. She comes to Xenophon with a strong background in Platonic and Aristotelian philosophy, which is a rarity among contemporary scholars.

Read more about Professor Chernyakhovskaya here.

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kulik

Alexander Kulik

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Hebrew University of Jerusalem
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Professor Alexander Kulik's research interests encompass several fields in the humanities. Kulik is an expert on the transmission of texts and ideas from the ancient through the medieval period, with a special interest in the adaptation of Greek concepts in the Judeo-Christian tradition. His linguistic background and experience in tradition criticism, combined with his interest in ancient Judeo-Greek thought, will provide a valuable perspective to our discussion of the history of concepts.

Read more about Professor Kulik here.

 

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poster

James Redfield

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University of Chicago
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Prof. James Redfield is the Emeritus Edward Olson Distinguished Service Professor of Classics at the University of Chicago. James is best known for his seminal work on Homer, Nature and Culture in the Iliad, which offered an anthropological perspective on Homeric society and values, and on the role of poetry and literature within it. Together with his studies of society and values in the later Greek world, this research provides invaluable points of reference for philosophical theories, especially of the Socratic circle. For the past fifteen years, James has been focusing his research on the Greek philosophers in the Socratic circle, and has written several articles on the subject.

Read more about Professor James Redfield here.

 

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Gabriel Danzig

Gabriel Danzig

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Bar-Ilan University
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Prof. Gabriel Danzig is Associate Professor in the Department of Classical Studies at Bar Ilan University. Gabriel has published on Plato and Aristotle's political and ethical thought, and numerous articles on different aspects of Xenophon's writing and thought. His recent articles have placed a special emphasis on the comparative study of Xenophon's ethical and political concepts. Together with Dave Johnson and Don Morrison, he edited a collection of essays from an international conference held in Israel, the first collection we know of on the comparative study of Plato and Xenophon. This project is a natural extension of his previous research.

Read more about Professor Danzig here.

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